Monthly Archives: July 2015

  • Saturday 25th July 2015 - not all work

    Luke with a fifteen-pound pollack Luke with a fifteen-pound pollack

    When Luke says we are busy preparing for the CLA Game Fair next weekend (see News Page), this is what he means! While the girls are busy packing books he is out enjoying himself. Oh - and I had to go along to take the pictures.  There's a lot of filleting, brining and smoking going on right now.

  • Saturday 25th July 2015 - preparing for the CLA

    Right now we are busy loading our convoy of vehicles for the CLA Game Fair next week. Our stand - number J1965 - is on the approach to Fisherman's Row and pretty close to the Food Court. We've got a busy and sociable weekend planned with lots of friends and authors coming along. Paul, Marion, Luke and Jane are being joined by Ken Callahan from New Hampshire, and Paul Hogan from Andalucia. Paul will be with us all weekend signing copies of his new book, Dry River: Flyfishing Tales, and Robert Smith, author of The North Country Fly: Yorkshire's Soft Hackle Tradition, will be with us at some time e very day. At 12 noon on Friday we will have Liam Bell signing copies of his new book, On Your Shoot, as well as Charles Smith-Jones, author of The Deer Stalker's Bedside Book and Muntjac: Managing an Alien Species. On 10 am on Sunday we will be joined by Tim Maddams for the launch ofGame, his new book on game cookery in the River Cottage series.

    Dry River
    Flyfishing Tales

    By Paul Hogan

    In Dry River, Paul Hogan describes fishing the waters of the places he has lived and worked: flyfishing for trout in the loughs and rivers of Southern Ireland; in the Otago district of New Zealand, and latterly, in southern Spain where he flyfishes for gypsy barbel and carp, and float-tubes for black bass, in the mountainous catchment of the Rio Guadalhorce with its large reservoirs and seasonally dry tributaries. Several of the author's watercolours of fish illustrate the book alongside three paintings in the same vein by the renowned American artist, James Prosek.

    A limited edition of only 500 signed and numbered copies. Hardback in dust-wrapper. Price £20.00


     

    The Mirror of Falcony
    by Pierre Harmont
    and
    The Falconry of Francois de Saincte Aulaire

    Translated by John Loft

    An exemplary translation of two important, and very scarce, 17th century French falconry books, to which John Loft has contributed many pages of informed commentary. The two books are of interest for their own sake: Loft's own contribution should be read by anybody who has read, or intends to read, other works on falconry of the period. If you haven't, you should.

    We have a few copies, each signed by John Loft.

    Mint new signed hardback in dust-wrapper. Price £40.00

    We will, as usual, be bringing along a huge range of new, second-hand and antiquarian sporting books. Here are just a few examples of recent publications that can be found on our stand at the weekend. If you would like us to bring along a particular book (anything on our website) please contact us well in advance - we'll be setting out several days early!
  • Dry River: Flyfishing Tales by Paul Hogan

    Dry River: Flyfishing Tales by Paul Hogan A limited first edition of only 500 signed and numbered copies. Publication date - 31st of July 2015 at the CLA Game Fair

    We are now accepting pre-orders for our new limited edition angling book, Dry River: Flyfishing Tales by Paul Hogan. To be launched at the CLA Game Fair 2015 in an edition of only 500 signed and numbered copies. Click on the link below for full information and to reserve your copy.

    http://www.anglebooks.com/dry-river-flyfishing-tales-by-pau…

    An engaging series of angling essays by an informed observer who thoroughly appreciates the places in which he has fished. In Dry River,Paul Hogan describes fishing the waters of the places he has lived and worked: flyfishing for trout in the loughs and rivers of Southern Ireland; in the Otago district of New Zealand, and latterly, in southern Spain where he flyfishes for gypsy barbel and carp, and float-tubes for black bass, in the mountainous catchment of the Rio Guadalhorce with its large reservoirs and its seasonally dry tributaries. As a biology teacher, the author has a sharp and informed eye for his surroundings and for those of his quarry. He makes interesting and relevant observations on the fish, the waters, and the varied wildlife which shares the habitat of the lone Andalusian angler. As a keen observer of fish, Hogan's interest extends to painting and this also has its place in the narrative. Several of the author's watercolours of fish illustrate the book alongside three paintings in the same vein by the renowned American artist, James Prosek.

  • Monday 13th July 2015 - and hatching 'em.

    I've been busier selling chickens than books this week. I advertised my spare teenage silkies locally, and sold them all within twenty-four hours. The following day my two broodies hatched 18 out of 20 eggs, so I shared the chicks with a third broody, and sold a further two families of hens and chicks, just keeping a few for myself.

    Ireland was nice and busy. Once again the weather was kind, with just enough night-time rain to freshen the river a little and improve the fishing. Luke and I caught lots of trout, some nice roach, and a few dollaghan, including one proper one of three pounds or so. As I played it in the dusk I was treated to the sight of a long-eared owl hawking above the river.
    After the game fair we headed south to Lough Corrib where were entertained by our friends, Philip White and Dennis Moss. Post-mayfly is a difficult time on the lough, but Mr Moss ghillied us in a nice wave and put us onto a few fish, while Mr White took us out in a flat calm at 4am the next day and showed us great pods of fish munching down caenis. We couldn't catch 'em, though.

    It's a season for mustelids. In my last entry I mentioned seeing four otters together, and then a stoat swimming the river; one evening this week I went for a walk and saw a family of five mink on the river-bank; and my friends in Ireland had been suffering from strawberry scrumpers - when they spotted the culprit it was a pine marten!

    Back home on the lakes, I think we've missed the coch-y-bonddu fall, but caught a few nice fish during the very brief evening rise to big sedges. It's a busy time for night-fishing on the river, so I usually keep out of the way. There are quite a few visiting anglers at this time of year, so the big pools of the lower river get rather crowded. I've had a couple of short sessions into the dark and caught a three-pounder and a handful of small sewin, but I haven't got serious about it yet. A couple of nights ago I rose a few fish on big salmon dry flies, so I'm hoping to tie (or scrounge) a few big mice and give them a swim. Right now, however, it is pouring with rain and the river is rising fast. It'll be too dirty to fish today, but who knows what tomorrow will bring?

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